Play Attention in the News

Time Magazine – 11/14/2011

Not long ago, a manager at the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) nuclear plant outside Toronto was completing a routine drill. The manager had to demonstrate that he could accurately instruct a computer to open and close a series of simulated valves–valves crucial to controlling the water and pressure that keep radioactive material contained. But this particular demonstration was unusual, since Lanzanin was operating the valves with his mind. He never touched a keyboard. And when his brain was focused enough to tell the valves onscreen to open or close, they obeyed. (Read more)

The Journal Times – 11/01/2011

Twelve-year-old Nikolas Hufen can control computer games with his mind.  Without touching the mouse or keyboard, Nikolas last Wednesday started a computer game and got objects on the screen to light up.  Nikolas, of Racine, was able to do so because of a portable EEG device strapped to his arm and connected to the computer by Bluetooth. The EEG measured Nikolas’s brain waves and when they showed focus and concentration, the game became active. In some cases his brain waves actually made characters on the screen move. (Read more)

Psychology Today – 07/28/2010

To meet Julian’s short-term attention needs, a physician prescribed medications to help him focus. For his long-term attention needs, we placed him on “Play Attention TM,” a computer-based attention training system that has been educationally proven to help children develop ther ability to focus, and reduce impulvity. We also included learning style training to help him harness his natural style of learning, and parent training to reinforce the behavioral changes we agreed upon. In all, Julian began to better understand how ADHD was impacting his life, learned how to better manage the challenges related to the disorder, and developed his ability to focus. Pdf(Read more)

Daily Mail – 01/11/2010

The news will infuriate millions of parents who have children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). A new British study has proved that children suffering from the behavioural disorder can control their symptoms – simply by learning self-discipline. Researchers from the University of Hertfordshire’s School of Psychology in Hatfield have been studying the effects of a thought-controlled computer game that requires the player to concentrate in order to win. PdfDailyMail.pdf(Read more)

Science Daily – 01/11/2010

The system involves the child playing a fun educational computer game while wearing a helmet similar to a bicycle helmet. The helmet picks up their brain activity in the form of EEG waves related to attention. As long as the child concentrates they control the games, but as soon as their attention waivers the game stops. Pdf(Read more)

ADDitude – 01/10/2010

“Researchers in the UK have been testing a thought-operated computer system to reduce the symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children. The system, called Play Attention, involves the child playing a fun, educational computer game while wearing a helmet. The helmet picks up brain activity in the form of EEG waves related to attention. As long as the child concentrates they control the game — as soon as their attention waivers the game stops.” Pdf(Read more)

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