Using the summer months to prepare for college

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The transition from high school to college is a challenge for even the most well-rounded student. Factor in ADHD and there are a whole new set of challenges. Parents should use the summer months to prepare their students for life at college. It's a great time to test the waters while having the safety net of home to help them through.

Play Attention is a great brain training tool for both children and adults with ADHD. Use Play Attention over the summer months to help your college bound student develop the skills necessary to be a good, independent learner. Play Attention strengthens skills such as attention stamina, working memory, visual tracking, task completion, impulse control, and more! Start now and give your child an edge as he/she departs for college.

    Here are some additional ideas you can use this summer to help with the transition:

Make Organization a Priority Since organization is a struggle for students with ADHD, most parents help with this process throughout high school. Now that your student will be on his own, it's important that he takes on the responsibility of organization. Having your student keep his room organized through the summer months will create a great foundation for his journey into college life. Make certain to discuss steps he can take to help with organization.

Keep Things Structured The summer months are usually the time when schedules go by the wayside; bed times are looser, meal times vary more, etc. Keeping things structured throughout the summer will help your budding college student stay in a routine. Since consistent and repetitive behavior gains proficiency, consider this type of structure the same as if you were helping your athlete prepare for the big game.

Research the Colleges Resources  While the hope is that you looked into this before applying, it's important that you help your student familiarize himself with the resources available to him on campus. There will be big adjustments like longer classes, later nights, more independent studying, etc. Create a plan for when things get tough, so your student isn't scrambling to find resources for support.

Visit the Campus  Many college campuses have programs throughout the summer months. There are typically concerts, sporting events, and lectures. It's a great time to visit the campus and get familiar with the layout. Even if you're not there to attend an event, a campus visit will allow your student to map out his day without the distraction of hundreds of other students.

Create a Game plan Your student will need a game plan if things get challenging. This might include a discussion with your students roommate to help keep things on track, or a plan to connect with a counselor once a week to discuss the week's obstacles.

Talk about Spending With books paid for and meal plans established, what more could your student need to spend money on? The answer is everything else! A trip to the movies or the mall, dinner with friends at the local pizza place, etc. These expenses can get out of control without a plan. Create a budget for your college student that will allow him to have a social life that won't break the bank. Also, talk to him about planning meals at college. Your student could run into financial difficulty with poor planning when meal halls are closed after late-night classes.

The more planning and discussions you have before your student goes off to college, the better prepared he will be. If you can help with some pre-planning and addressing any anxieties, it will be easier for your student to be successful as he ventures into college life.

convertforms-03 Using the summer months to prepare for college - Play Attention | Neurocognitive program for training Executive Functions
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