Are Mothers of ADHD Children More Likely to Be Depressed?

Are Mothers of ADHD Children More Likely to Be Depressed?
A small study raises questions…

Read More: http://specialedpost.org/2012/10/28/parenting-a-child-with-adhd-may-trigger-situational-depression/

According to Dr. Louis McCormick, a Louisiana-based family physician, mothers of ADHD children may be at increased risk for depression.

McCormick conducted a year-long study of mothers of children with ADHD who were patients in his Franklin, La., medical practice. Dr. McCormick gave 39 mothers the Self-Test for Depression. Of those 39 mothers, 21 (roughly 54%) had scores that suggested depression.

While this is a small sample, it suggests something that ADHD parents already know: parenting ADHD children can be stressful. Depression caused by events in one’s life is termed ‘situational depression.’ Parenting children who are impulsive, hyper-active, accident prone, or unable to follow directions can be quite stressful.

Previous university research indicates that parents of ADHD children are at double the risk of divorce before their ADHD child even reaches the age of 8!

One may speculate that mothers of ADHD children may have a biological propensity to depression. McCormick postulates that the c may trigger that predisposition to depression.

The research cited indicates that one must take action as a parent not only for the ADHD child, but also for the parents’ own mental health.

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Do you have ADHD or a language impairment?

Do you have ADHD or a language impairment?

Read more: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published a study that examined language impairments (LI) and ADHD. They found an association, but perhaps not what you’d expect.

The research indicates that testing for LI is very important when testing for ADHD.

Language impairment may be defined as significant difficulties affecting listening comprehension, oral expression, social interaction, reading, writing, or spelling. Its very definition reads like a checklist for ADHD symptoms.

The researchers found that LI are commonly observed among children referred for psychiatric services — especially ADHD. This would seem to makes sense; many children with ADHD have the same symptoms as LI:

1. They have poor social interactions manifesting in an inability to make friends.
2. They have poor listening comprehension manifesting when they cannot take multiple step instructions (e.g. Go to your bedroom, put your pajamas on, brush your teeth, get in bed).
3. They have difficulty expressing themselves orally resulting in frustration and angry outbursts.
4. They often have difficulty with reading, writing, and spelling.

The researchers concluded that children with LI were at the most disadvantage regardless of the nature of the psychiatric diagnosis.

Furthermore, the researchers noted that “…caution must be exercised in attributing to children with ADHD what might be a reflection of problems for children with language impairment generally. As most therapies are verbally based it is notable that language competence is rarely evaluated systematically before such therapies are undertaken.”

In another study performed in Norway, Speech Therapist Wenche Andersen Helland noted, “There is often a one-sided focus on the behavior of kids with ADHD. But these children may have communication problems as they grow older, particularly in a school situation, if their language skills are not given enough attention. If we don’t work hard enough to strengthen language development in children with ADHD, we increase the risk that they won’t learn what they should in school. They’ll also be more likely to fall short in social interactions with their peers. We need to intervene early to prevent a downward spiral.”

In other words, check for LI when checking for ADHD. This cannot be accomplished in the typical 20 minute session with a pediatrician. A speech language pathologist can determine a language impairment. The bottom line is that it is wise to get a full evaluation from a specialist that includes a full physical, vision test, language impairment test, and others.

Ramya Goes from Teacher Complaints to Teacher Praise

Ramya Goes from Teacher Complaints to Teacher Praise
A Play Attention success story from her mother
Ramya was having trouble with finishing her homework assignments on time. Even once she finished them after a long time, there would be several mistakes and incomplete problems.

Eventually I found out about Play Attention a program designed to help kids with focusing, distraction, attention and listening. A few months after beginning her program with Play Attention, to my surprise I began receiving calls from her teacher that Ramya was doing great.

Read Ramya’s full story at http://www.playattention.com/ramya-success

Ramya is very attentive in class and exceeded grade expectations! | Play Attention
www.playattention.com
I felt amazed the first time when I heard from Ramya’s teacher that she was doing great. I could see the happiness and…

Are You a Better Parent if You’re Medicated?

Are You a Better Parent if You’re Medicated?
Penn State researchers say YES!

Read More: http://news.psu.edu/story/321808/2014/07/30/research/parenting-skills-improve-adhd-parents-medication

Penn State News reports on a small study done at Penn State and funded by Shire Inc., the manufacturer of lisdexamfetamine, (aka Vyvanse) where ADHD parents received medication to help them cope with their children.

One of the lead researchers, Dr. James Waxmonsky noted, “Parents with ADHD are at increased risk to engage in problematic parenting techniques, including inconsistent disciplinary practices, making ineffectual commands and diminished use of praise. Having a parent with ADHD also decreases the chances that children with ADHD will respond to typically effective medication or counseling treatment.”

So, the solution? Medicate the parents! The researchers selected 20 parents who had children age 5 to 12. Both parents had a diagnosis presenting ADHD. The researchers then gave the parents ‘optimal’ doses of lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse).

The parents were then brought to the clinic for observation on two tasks: 1] The child performs homework with parental assistance, and 2] The child plays while the parent performs paperwork.

The parent was administered either a placebo or Vyvanse for the first observation. This was then reversed for the second observation period. Neither the researchers nor participants knew when the active medication was received.

According to Penn State News, “The results of the first phase showed no medication effect was seen during the homework component. During the non-academic component, parents were less likely to make negative statements toward their children on lisdexamfetamine than on placebo.

Children showed less inappropriate behavior during the homework task when their parent was prescribed lisdexamfetamine versus placebo.

Then, in the second phase, parents had a 50 percent chance of staying on active medication or a 50 percent chance of being switched to placebo for the remainder of the study. They completed the same parent-child interaction tasks as in the first phase.”

“In the laboratory setting, lisdexamfetamine treatment of parental ADHD was associated with significant reductions in children’s negative behaviors and improvements in parenting behaviors found to be adversely impacted by ADHD,” Waxmonsky said.

Can you think of a better way to expand this market?

New Study Show Stimulant Meds Increase Cardiovascular Events

New Study Show Stimulant Meds Increase Cardiovascular Events
What every parent should know

Read More: http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/adolescents-and-teen-health-news-719/adhd-drugs-may-up-risk-of-heart-problems-689468.html

 

(HealthDay News) — Stimulant use in children and adolescents is associated with an increased risk of a subsequent cardiovascular event, according to a study published online June 23 in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Søren Dalsgaard, MD, PhD, from Aarhus University in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a longitudinal prospective study of all children born in Denmark from 1990–1999. The authors sought to examine whether stimulant users are at increased risk of a subsequent cardiovascular event. Data were collected from national health registers on psychiatric and somatic diagnoses, stimulant prescriptions, cardiovascular risk factors, and pre- and perinatal and sociodemographic covariates. Data were merged for children and their parents.

Using data for a total population of 714,258 children, contributing 6,767,982 person-years, the researchers found that stimulant use correlated with an increased risk of a cardiovascular event (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.83). Stimulant treatment also increased the risk of a cardiovascular event in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; 8,300 children; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.20), with evidence of a complex time-dependent, dose-response association.

“Cardiovascular events were rare but twice as likely in stimulant users as in nonusers, both in the total national population and in children with ADHD,” the authors write. “Our results suggest a safety signal with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with stimulant treatment in children and adolescents, even after adjusting for a number of potential confounders.”

ADHD ‘Inextricably’ Linked to Substance Abuse

New study says parents beware

Abstract:  http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/134/1/e293.abstract

The journal Pediatrics published a study (June 30) which found that children with ADHD are 2 times more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence and more than 2.5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder (SUD). Additionally, ADHD children are twice as likely to develop cocaine abuse or dependence.

Is there any good news? The researchers noted that stimulant medication may reduce the risk for trying drugs and developing an SUD. Prior studies both contradict and confirm this.

The study’s authors warn, “Individuals with co-occurring ADHD and active SUDs require a careful, individual risk/benefit assessment regarding the safety of prescribing a stimulant medication. Longer acting preparations of stimulant medication, the prodrug formulation of dextroamphetamine, and nonstimulant medications for ADHD all have lower abuse potential than short-acting preparations of stimulant medication and, thus, their use should be strongly considered if there is a high risk of misuse, diversion, or abuse of stimulant medications.”

“Misuse and diversion of stimulant medications are more widespread problems than abuse or addiction,” the report states. What is diversion? Diversion is your child not using the medication as prescribed, but rather selling it to someone else.

The report indicates that prior research suggests that between 16% and 23% of school-aged children are approached to sell, buy, or trade their stimulant medication.

Surge in women taking drugs for ADHD

Surge in women taking drugs for ADHD
What’s behind this?

From Newsday: http://www.newsday.com/news/health/surge-in-women-taking-drugs-for-adhd-1.7372481

“The number of Americans taking attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medicines rose 36% in 2012 from 2008, led by a surge among women, according to drug-benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co.

Use of the medications grew 85 percent in 2012 from 2008 for women ages 26 to 34, and women 19 and over now outnumber men in use of the medicines, according to the report released yesterday. Boys 12 to 18 years old are the most heavily prescribed, with about 9.3 percent on ADHD drugs in 2012.

Almost 4.8 million privately insured people were on ADHD medicines in 2012, the report said. Those with the disorder have problems paying attention, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.”

How does one explain the incredible increase in ADHD medication use especially among women ages 26 to 34? Is it due to increased stress? The demands of home and work? Better marketing among these women? Can a pill fix these problems?

Your opinions are welcome.

Toddlers Being Prescribed ADHD Meds

Toddlers Being Prescribed ADHD Meds

Read more: http://www.inquisitr.com/1259397/cdc-finds-shocking-number-of-toddlers-medicated-for-adhd-medicaid-recipients-especially-vulnerable/

The Centers for Disease Control reports that Medicaid claims in Georgia reveal 1 in 225 toddlers are medicated for ADHD – that’s 760 cases in the state alone. The CDC estimates that more than 10,000 toddlers may be taking ADHD medications.

Dr. Lawrence H. Diller, a behavioral pediatrician in Walnut Creek, Calif. and author of The Last Normal Child said, “People prescribing to 2-year-olds are just winging it. It is outside the standard of care, and they should be subject to malpractice if something goes wrong with a kid.”

Dr. Ed Hallowell, a noted child psychiatrist and ADHD expert appeared on Fox and Friends. He said it’s “crazy” that toddlers are being given drugs like Adderall and Ritalin.

“People are looking for a quick solution to the age-old problem of rambunctious little toddlers,” he said. “The solution is not to give them medication. The solution is to play with them, to be with them, to take care of them. Not to give them a pill in the hopes
that’ll quiet them down.”

Prescriptions for toddlers are being granted despite the fact that ADHD medication has not been studied for this group. Indeed the American Academy of Pediatrics does not even broach the subject of ADHD medication in toddlers (children under 4 years old).

Two year olds are notably rambunctious. Most experts agree that it’s far too early to diagnose ADHD at age 2. Your opinions are welcome.

NASA Features Play Attention

NASA Features Play Attention
NASA Spinoff magazine reveals Play Attention’s space connection

Play Attention was inspired by research done at NASA. Dr. Alan Pope’s experiments on astronaut attention provided the basis for Play Attention which enhanced NASA’s technology.

Play Attention’s founder, Peter Freer, made the technology easy to use for any family or professional. Play Attention is now the global leader in assistive technology for ADHD.

Read for full article here on page 86: http://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2013/pdf/Spinoff2013.pdf

A Little Play Attention Goes A Long Way

A Little Play Attention Goes A Long Way
Additude Magazine
A Little Neurofeedback Goes a Long Way
www.additudemag.com
One more study shows that controlling brain waves…